• At long last

    Drug could hold key to longer life

    It sounds like a magic pill—a drug that could help you live longer and could even sharpen your mind. But does it really work? Ramiro Guerra’s children believe so.

    Read his story
  • What if the brain could quickly heal itself after a concussion?

    It’s possible, with a little help from its (appropriately named) caretaker cells.

    Find out how
  • No ordinary lesson

    Dental students face the realities of homelessness.

    An inside look
  • Heartening journey

    After numerous heart procedures, the prognosis turned bleak.
    So doctors pushed the boundaries of science to extend a father’s life.

    A fight for life

Features

At long last

At long last

Ramiro Guerra's memories are slipping away. So when the 90-year-old was offered the chance to join a research study of a drug thought to slow down aging, he jumped at the chance.

Pursuing concussion’s cure

Pursuing concussion’s cure

Concussions happen every day, everywhere, to anyone. But what if the brain could be stimulated to heal itself? Researchers in the School of Medicine have discovered a possible avenue to do just that.

No ordinary lesson

No ordinary lesson

All fourth-year dental students must complete clinical rotations before graduating. Yet there’s one clinic that is met with both dread and anticipation, and offers an experience unlike any other.

Heartening journey

Heartening journey

After numerous heart procedures, the prognosis turned bleak for Andres Castillo Jr. So doctors pushed the boundaries of science to extend this single father’s life.

Drawing it out

Drawing it out

Asthma2Art allows children to express what it feels like to live with asthma, a lung disease that affects an estimated 7 million children in the United States.

Asking 'why not?'

Asking 'why not?'

It started with a simple question: Why can’t kids with disabilities play sports?

University in Motion

First patient given novel brain tumor treatment

First patient given novel brain tumor treatment

David Williams became the first person to have a new radiation treatment implanted in the center of his brain tumor.

Broccoli for life

Broccoli for life

Want to live longer? Change your diet and eat more broccoli, Brussels sprouts and cabbage, researchers say.

Staying in balance after stroke

Staying in balance after stroke

Strokes affect nearly a million Americans each year, but a drug used for epilepsy could dramatically reduce their debilitating impact.

School of Nursing faculty and students collaborate with nurses from Mexico

School of Nursing faculty and students collaborate with nurses from Mexico

New program allows them to better coordinate clinical and educational programs, and integrate research into the process.

Early detection

Early detection

First FDA-approved microarray testing rapidly diagnoses genetic conditions in babies.

Dental implants for diabetics

Dental implants for diabetics

Study shows that diabetic patients—even those with poorly controlled diabetes—can have success with dental implants too.

Drug cocktails increase risk of death

Drug cocktails increase risk of death

Most drug overdoses are unintentional, researcher says.

Molecules in 3-D

Molecules in 3-D

Researchers use X-ray crystallography to visualize the three-dimensional structure of the bound HIV-1 capsid.

‘Most hopeful’ suicide research

‘Most hopeful’ suicide research

Short-term cognitive behavioral therapy dramatically reduces suicide attempts among at-risk military personnel.

Nobel laureate stresses the power of science

Nobel laureate stresses the power of science

Nobel Laureate Peter Agre, M.D., was the featured speaker at the 2015 Presidential Distinguished Lecture. He shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

There's a tsunami approaching

There's a tsunami approaching

Every day, more than 1,000 people are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. These are our mothers, sisters, fathers, brothers and spouses.

Matchmaking at Match Day 2015

Matchmaking at Match Day 2015

With the ripping of envelopes, more than 200 School of Medicine students learned where they would spend the next three to seven years as residents before launching their medical careers.

Making Lives Better

Teaching. Discovering. Healing.

Alzheimer’s disease research gets multi-million dollar boost

Alzheimer’s disease research gets multi-million dollar boost

The Health Science Center is working to establish a comprehensive Alzheimer’s and neurodegenerative disease institute, spurred by recent gifts to the university.

Window to the brain

Window to the brain

Martin Paukert, M.D., is the principal investigator of a grant to study brain activity that may take place long before Alzheimer’s disease symptoms are observed.

Mays Family Foundation marks CTRC anniversary with $5 million gift

Mays Family Foundation marks CTRC anniversary with $5 million gift

The Mays Family Foundation Distinguished University Presidential Chair is for the director of the CTRC.

Grant helps advance the education of nurses

Grant helps advance the education of nurses

More students will be entering the School of Nursing, thanks to a $700,000 grant from Methodist Healthcare Ministries of South Texas, Inc.

Professor emeritus continues life’s work through endowment

Professor emeritus continues life’s work through endowment

Rajam Ramamurthy, M.D., may have been born and raised in India, but she’s grown fond of a particular American idiom.

Biomedical research program gets additional funding

Biomedical research program gets additional funding

High school students can participate in a biomedical research program, thanks to a $675,000 grant from The Max and Minnie Tomerlin Voelcker Fund.

Reaching out

Reaching out

A $600,000 three-year grant from the Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation is supporting a new nurse-led clinic for children.