Nobel Laureate Peter Agre

Nobel laureate stresses the power of science

Nobel Laureate Peter Agre, M.D., was the featured speaker at the 2015 Presidential Distinguished Lecture. He shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Nobel Laureate Peter Agre, M.D., was the featured speaker at the 2015 Presidential Distinguished Lecture. He shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Peter Agre, M.D., Nobel laureate and director of the Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute, spoke about the power of science during the 2015 Presidential Distinguished Lecture March 26.

“We should never underestimate the power of science to open doors,” he said.

Dr. Agre shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery of aquaporins, a family of water channel proteins found throughout nature. Referred to as “the plumbing system for cells,” aquaporins are involved in numerous physiological processes in humans and are implicated in multiple clinical disorders including malaria.

Dr. Agre joined the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine faculty in 1981 and has served as director of the Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute at the Bloomberg School of Public Health since 2008. He oversees 20 faculty research groups as well as field activities in Zimbabwe and Zambia.

In a personal message to UT Health Science Center students and written in the Presidential Distinguished Lecture Series Commemorative Album, on permanent display in the Dolph Briscoe Jr. Library, Dr. Agre said his message was simple: Creative science that will shape the future is undertaken by young scientists.

“The experiences you are having right now may have profound impact,” he wrote. “And importantly, you do not have to be perfect in order to do something important.

“Please take advantage of opportunities, keep the faith and never give up. The world is counting on you.”

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